The Interview

  • When states and cities around the country initiated shelter-in-place procedures to help fight the coronavirus, the impact was felt on every aspect of daily life—including the process of securing work.
  • Are you ready for your screening interviews? This first-level conversation with an employer is the source of much anxiety for candidates, and for good reason: The purpose of the conversation is to decide which candidates can be moved forward in the process, and which ones are not a good fit. In o...
  • If you’ve been to a job interview lately—as either the candidate or the interviewer—then you may be familiar with a style of question called “behavioral.” Behavioral interview questions are based on a principle of psychology which states, in essence, that how a person has acted in the past under ...
  • For neurology professionals at mid-career (or later), job interviews can be a mixed bag. On the one hand, they’re an opportunity, as always, to present your strengths and learn where you’d fit in an organization, whether that’s a hospital, practice group, or somewhere in private industry.
  • If you’ve been in many interviews (and by now, you probably have), you already know how awkward it can be to be asked a challenging question. Those are the queries that stop you in your tracks while your mind darts around frantically for some kind of answer.
  • If you’re a medical resident or fellow, you may have wondered if your future job interviews will be any different than the interviews you participated in for your current role.
  • If you received a call from a practice or hospital interested in hiring you, would you be prepared for the interview? Many physicians today find themselves unaware of how to successfully navigate the physician interviewing process. By understanding what to expect and how to prepare, you can signi...
  • Luckily, some questions are so commonly asked that you can expect to encounter them in most, if not all of your interviews. These “evergreens” serve as multi-purpose queries for employers, as useful when hiring residents as they are for evaluating the next chief of staff.
  • If you’re preparing for interviews, you might be wondering about the questions you’ll be asked. That’s a good start— you need to anticipate interviewers’ interests and your answers to their queries. But what about your questions? Is it ever appropriate to come with your own list of items to be cl...
  • If you’ve never interviewed for a job, or if it’s been quite awhile, you’re probably feeling a little nervous about the prospect of facing a potential employer or panel of future colleagues. That’s a good sign—not feeling nervous means you’re not paying attention.
  • It’s funny how the little things can seem more daunting than the big ones. Finish medical school? Check. Excel in residency and fellowships? Check. Find that first job as a doctor? Uh-oh. It’s not that job search is so difficult. It’s just hard to know where to begin.
  • Interviewing, like almost everything humans undertake, is a skill that improves with practice. Unfortunately for busy neurologists, interview “practice” is more likely to happen during the first round of meetings with future employers, and not in a leisurely strategy session with a career counsel...