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  • 5 Most Common Interview Questions

    • Jan 21, 2020

    Luckily, some questions are so commonly asked that you can expect to encounter them in most, if not all of your interviews. These “evergreens” serve as multi-purpose queries for employers, as useful when hiring residents as they are for evaluating the next chief of staff.

  • Questions to Ask in an Interview

    • Jan 21, 2020

    If you’re preparing for interviews, you might be wondering about the questions you’ll be asked. That’s a good start— you need to anticipate interviewers’ interests and your answers to their queries. But what about your questions? Is it ever appropriate to come with your own list of items to be clarified or explained? In a word: Yes. Not only is it appropriate to ask questions of your own, but not doing so puts you at risk for looking disengaged from the process.

  • Winning Over the Screener - First Interview Strategies

    • Jan 21, 2020

    Are you ready for your screening interviews? This first-level conversation with an employer is the source of much anxiety for candidates, and for good reason: The purpose of the conversation is to decide which candidates can be moved forward in the process, and which ones are not a good fit. In other words, you can be as easily screened out as in—so of course, that can be nerve-wracking.

  • An Interview Guide for First-time Candidates

    • Jan 21, 2020

    If you’ve never interviewed for a job, or if it’s been quite awhile, you’re probably feeling a little nervous about the prospect of facing a potential employer or panel of future colleagues. That’s a good sign—not feeling nervous means you’re not paying attention.

  • A Day in the Life of a Hospital-employed Neurologist

    • Apr 8, 2019

    One of the most difficult decisions most fellows and residents face is what type of practice setting to enter after training. Academic? Private practice? Clinic or hospital?

  • Career Center Upgrades and Your Job Search Are a Winning Combination

    • Jul 14, 2018

    For Career Services Senior Manager Amy Schoch, the uptick in candidate responses to Career Center job postings is very gratifying since it confirms the Career Center remains a relevant member program. Having the AAN membership embrace the changes by making even more use of the Career Center lets her know the Academy is making good choices in serving members’ career needs.

  • The Job Seeker Perspective: Nirali D. Soni, MD

    • Apr 10, 2018

    When Nirali D. Soni, MD, completed her residency at the University of Arizona last June, she knew she needed to keep a tight schedule to meet her goals: At the same time, of course, she would be mastering her duties as an epilepsy fellow at the University of Arizona. Does that sound stressful? Soni admits to feeling some strain but says that, for the most part, it wasn’t over the top.

  • Anatomy of a Career Transition: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN

    • Apr 4, 2018

    “If you had told me three or four years ago that I would land in Allentown, I would have been quite surprised,” he says. “It wasn’t on my radar. But I’m very happy here.”

  • Ben Tolchin: One Job Seeker's Perspective on the Job Hunt

    • Jan 5, 2017

    Job search can be full of surprises, as well as ups and downs. For Ben Tolchin, a clinical epilepsy fellow in his last year of training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, the search for employment has taken some interesting turns. 

  • Interview strategies for the mid-career professional

    • Apr 16, 2016

    For neurology professionals at mid-career (or later), job interviews can be a mixed bag. On the one hand, they’re an opportunity, as always, to present your strengths and learn where you’d fit in an organization, whether that’s a hospital, practice group, or somewhere in private industry.

  • One Doctor's 15-year Perspective on Networking at the Annual Meeting

    • Apr 7, 2015

    For Natalia Rost, MD, FAAN, associate professor of neurology for Harvard Medical School, there’s no place she’d rather be each spring. A veteran of at least 15 Annual Meetings, Dr. Rost first attended as a medical student, urged on by advisors who saw her interest in neurology. Once there, Dr. Rost quickly connected with the newly forming Student Interest Group in Neurology (SIGN) and began affiliations that have lasted her career.