All Careers Advice

  • According to the American Academy of Neurology, the percentage of US AAN member neurologists in solo practice dropped from 23 percent in 2008 to 13 percent in 2018. Reasons for the decline are not surprising: everything from the complexity of billing to the increased costs of insurance to the ris...
  • A lot is written about job search for new graduates, and that’s a good thing. After a dozen or more years of education and intensive training, the last thing most residents and fellows feel prepared for is CV writing or interviewing with an HR panel.
  • If you’re a woman practicing medicine in a neurological specialty, chances are good that you’re not earning as much as you could be. More pointedly, you may not be earning as much as male counterparts doing the same work.
  • Statistics are not plentiful on the number of fellowship double-dippers, but the anecdotal evidence suggests there has been an increase in doctors extending their training through multiple fellowship experiences. The choice itself can’t be easy. While there’s the obvious advantage of adding crede...
  • With the practice of neurology becoming more complex by the minute, there’s a lot of pressure on physicians to follow up their neurology residency with even more specialized instruction in the form of a fellowship. Reasons to advance to this next level of training range from the desire (or need) ...
  • This comes back to the question of what you’re willing to give up to reach your goals. Multiple scenarios could be developed to describe any number of strategies that parlay your specialty training into a productive part of your next job. For the sake of simplicity, let’s look at three. Then, you...
  • Career transitions for medical professionals can be tricky. You’ve invested tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in your career already, not to mention years of study and apprenticeship.And yet, if you’re not happy, what’s the point in pretending you are? Unhappy workers don’t tend to invest ...
  • What happens when you ask a busy neurologist to keep a journal for two weeks, cataloging her work activities and daily routines? Well, if the doctor you’ve chosen for this experiment is a pharmaceutical executive like Kathleen Hawker, you’re likely to get a peek inside a whirlwind of travel and m...
  • If it’s 7:00 a.m. and you’re the chief resident in neurology at Tufts Medical Center, you know where you’re going to be: Standing bright-eyed and alert with the float residents to learn what happened with neurological patients overnight. Even if your call the night before robbed you of some sleep...
  • If you’ve read any career or job search advice lately, then you know how frequently networking is prescribed as the solution to your problems or the pathway to your goals. When you add up all the curative powers of this one process, it’s almost as if networking were the career equivalent of eatin...
  • If your purpose for attending is to present information to fellow neurology professionals, learn from others who are presenting, meet up with friends and colleagues, or make the acquaintance of neurologists you haven’t met yet, you’re about to engage in networking without needing to call it that....
  • Pay structures vary and can be confusing, especially for someone just starting their career. Use the Salary Calculator Tool as a starting point in your negotiations before signing an employment contract. This tool is ONLY available to AAN member residents and fellows, and it’s offered at no ch...
  • If you’re a medical resident or fellow, you may have wondered if your future job interviews will be any different than the interviews you participated in for your current role.
  • If you received a call from a practice or hospital interested in hiring you, would you be prepared for the interview? Many physicians today find themselves unaware of how to successfully navigate the physician interviewing process. By understanding what to expect and how to prepare, you can signi...
  • Luckily, some questions are so commonly asked that you can expect to encounter them in most, if not all of your interviews. These “evergreens” serve as multi-purpose queries for employers, as useful when hiring residents as they are for evaluating the next chief of staff.
  • If you’re preparing for interviews, you might be wondering about the questions you’ll be asked. That’s a good start— you need to anticipate interviewers’ interests and your answers to their queries. But what about your questions? Is it ever appropriate to come with your own list of items to be cl...
  • Are you ready for your screening interviews? This first-level conversation with an employer is the source of much anxiety for candidates, and for good reason: The purpose of the conversation is to decide which candidates can be moved forward in the process, and which ones are not a good fit. In o...
  • If you’ve never interviewed for a job, or if it’s been quite awhile, you’re probably feeling a little nervous about the prospect of facing a potential employer or panel of future colleagues. That’s a good sign—not feeling nervous means you’re not paying attention.
  • One of the most difficult decisions most fellows and residents face is what type of practice setting to enter after training. Academic? Private practice? Clinic or hospital?
  • For Career Services Senior Manager Amy Schoch, the uptick in candidate responses to Career Center job postings is very gratifying since it confirms the Career Center remains a relevant member program. Having the AAN membership embrace the changes by making even more use of the Career Center lets ...